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April 23rd - April 27th, 2012


Regional Updates

Community Updates

Action Alerts

Grants Available

Sponsor

Leadership Huntington

The Leadership Huntington Foundation has a distinguished history of serving the citizens of Huntington and impacting the Long Island Region. Since it’s beginning in 1995, LH has trained over 250 graduates. You will find Leadership Huntington’s influence in every corner of our community. Leadership Huntington has established one of the model community leadership programs in the country right in our own backyard. The first and only community leadership program on Long Island. 

Interested citizens can choose from an expanding array of programming. Their Flagship Program takes you on a nine month journey where participants build on their leadership skills and develop an in-depth understanding of our community, celebrating history, arts, and “what we love” at the same reflecting on the challenges of a changing world; all through direct “hands-on” experiences.
 
In addition to the LH Flagship Program, LH has introduced a series of citizen accessible workshops, community tours, and hot topic forums designed to Engage, Connect, and Develop citizens to actively embrace opportunities and challenges that are critical to creating a thriving community.

opening words

This week we feature quotes from various lawmakers and stakeholders who participated in last week's Central Islip Visioning:

“I am very excited that this project is finally starting to happen. We have been waiting 50 years for this park in Central Islip. We want to make it a multi-generational area, for all ages to enjoy. It has been wonderful to work with the Town of Islip, Vision Long Island and community leaders who spent a lot of hours together to make this happen.” - Amparo Saddler, Central Islip Chamber and Central Islip Park & Recreation Committee


“This parkland is 50 years in the making. We are excited this current town board, including Supervisor Tom Croci and Councilman Steve Flotteron, have kept their campaign promises to build the park,” - Debbie Cavanagh of the Coalition of Good Neighbors.


“We want to tell people CI is here! We’re real, we don’t bite! It’s safe to come here! … Dream on this, think the biggest things you can think of. Because you know what? We might just find a way to make it happen.” - Debbie Rotunda, Parks Committee

 

“We have been working for many years to get some good recreational facilities for our kids, and I’m absolutely thrilled to see all of you here today because this is really a turning point in our community for our children.” - Nancy Manfredonia, Central Islip Civic Council

 

“We wanted an open, transparent process where everyone can participate and take ownership in the end result. Recognizing that the community knows best their needs and desires for this park, we are pleased to introduce a process that will bring their vision to life.”  - Steve Flotteron, Town of Islip Councilman


“This is about beautifying our communities here on LI, to make this a more business-friendly place. But more than that it’s about reclaiming the identity of your towns; finding a way to leave your imprint, to make this the town you want it to be, and not let other people make that decision for you...Civic engagement is what really makes our community special.” - Scott Martella, Office of NYS Governor Andrew Cuomo


“It’s amazing how much you can accomplish when you work together with your colleagues... All levels of government are working together on this... It’s really a great reflection on the community that all of you are here this morning.” - NYS Senator Lee Zeldin


“There is no Democratic way to revitalize a downtown or Republican way to fix a park. We know what we have to do. Campaign is campaign, but there’s a time for us to do our jobs and work together and get the resources and just make it happen.” - NYS Assemblyman Phil Ramos


“This is a dream that Central Islip has pursued for many years... Anything that we can do to in the County of Suffolk to improve the quality of life for the community that I represent, believe me we’re going to do it.” - Suffolk County Legislator Rick Montano

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We are pleased to announce the honoree for this year's

Regional Leadership Award

NYS Regional Economic Development Councils
Lt. Governor Robert Duffy

Master of Ceremonies

John Kominicki
Long Island Business News

This year, we also honor:

Walkability

NYS Complete Streets Law
NYS Senator Charles Fuschillo
& Sandi Vega

Community Participation

Huntington Station Enrichment Center
Dolores Thompson

Transportation Choices

Transit Oriented Development Zoning
Hon. Jean Celender, Village of Great Neck Plaza

Clean Energy

EmPower Solar
David Schieren

Housing Choices

Metro 303, Hempstead
Mill Creek Residential Trust

Housing Choices

The River Walk, Patchogue
GRB Development Corp.

Compact Design

Water Mill Station
Koral Brothers

Creating Great Places

The Paramount, Huntington

Revitalizing Communities

Farmingdale Hotel & Mixed Use
Bartone Properties & BWC Realty Partners

Certainty & Predicatability

Elmont Mixed-Use Zoning District
Town of Hempstead

Vision Long Island congratulates this year's
Smart Growth Awards winners!

Online registration is now available, or feel free to download a copy of our registration form and mail it to: Vision Long Island, 24 Woodbine Ave, Suite 2, Northport, NY 11768

Vision Long Island is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization
All donations over the fair market value of $30 per ticket are tax deductable

Register today! Sponsorships and journal advertisements are available!

[ ] Visionary ($15,000) [ ] Leader ($10,000) [ ] Gold Sponsor ($5,000) [ ] Sponsor ($2,000) [ ] ___ seats ($100/person)
Journal ads: [ ] Full page color (8" x 10.5") ($1,000) [ ] Half page color (8" x 5.25") ($500) [ ] Quarter page color (4" x 5.25") ($250)
Method of Payment: [ ] Check enclosed [ ] Check sent (faxed replies only) [ ] Pay at the door [ ] Credit Card

Attendee Name(s): ___________________________________________________________________________________________

Affiliation:___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Address: ___________________________________________________City, State, Zip: __________________________________

Email: ________________________________________ Phone: _________________________ Fax: ________________________

Credit Card: [ ] Visa [ ] MasterCard [ ] American Express Name, as it appears on card: ___________________________________

Credit Card Number: ____________________________________________________ Expiration Date: _______________________

Please send questions and RSVPs by phone to 631-261-0242, by email to info@visionlongisland.org or by fax to 631-754-4452.

Regional Updates

Announcing the 11th Annual Smart Growth Awards! Vision holds kick-off event


Pictured (L-R): Hempstead Town Councilman Edward Ambrosino, Eric Alexander - Vision Long Island, Dave Leno - Ruskin Moscou Faltischek, Mike Kelly - Kelly Development, Brookhaven Town Councilwoman Connie Kepert, Art Bartone - Bartone Properties, and Scott Martella - Office of NYS Governor Andrew Cuomo


Pictured (L-R): Keith Samaroo - PS&S, Joe Cosenza - Ivy Properties, Dr. Nathalia Rogers - American Communities Institute at Dowling College, Mayer Horn - Greenman-Pedersen Inc, Tawaun Weber - Vision Long Island, John Trotta - Posillico


Pictured (L-R): Mike Kelly - Kelly Development, Vita Scaturro - Community National Bank, Howard Stein - Certilman Balin, Jorge Martinez - BCM Solutions, Greg Cherry - American Transit Insurance, Keith Archer - Harras Bloom & Archer


Pictured (L-R): Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Bartone, David Schieran - EmPower Solar, Joe Cosenza - Ivy Properties, Kyle Strober - Office of US Senator Charles Schumer, Ross Ain - Caithness Energy, Michael Faltischek - Ruscin Moscou Faltischek


Pictured (L-R): Bob Fonti - Long Island Business Council, Eric Alexander - Vision Long Island, Jan Burman - Engel Burman Group, Steven Krieger - Engel Burman Group

On April 25th, Vision Long Island hosted a kick-off reception for the 2012 Annual Smart Growth Awards, taking place on Friday, June 15th from 11:30-2:00pm. The event was held at the Carltun on the Park in Eisenhower Park and was a fun meet-and-greet between many of our event’s honorees and sponsors.

Check out some recent press on the Awards:

-LI Herald on Senator Fuschillo for Complete Streets
-Farmingdale Observer on Bartone Plaza Hotel and Mixed-Use
-The Island Now on Village of Great Neck Plaza/Mayor Jean Celender’s TOD Zoning
-Town of Hempstead featuring the Elmont Corridor Plan and EmPower Solar

Earth Day Lobby Day pushes solar jobs; EPF funding

On April 25th, Vision participated in the 22nd annual Earth Day Lobby Day in Albany, which drew well over 100 people from throughout the state to urge representatives to enact critical legislation that will protect the environment and build a clean energy economy. The day consisted of a high-energy morning program and productive afternoon lobby visits with over 90 state legislators.

The morning program presented the five “Super Bills” that the coalition supports this year. Vision was there to support the Solar Industry Development and Jobs Act (A.9149A / S.4178A, not currently same as). This legislation would create thousands of new solar jobs and jumpstart investment in New York’s growing solar energy industry by requiring that 3,000 megawatts be installed on the grid by 2021—enough to generate over 3,400 gigawatt-hours of electricity to power over 300,000 households, equivalent to nearly two percent of New York State’s total electric load. Adding that much solar to our energy mix would reduce as much carbon pollution as taking nearly two million cars off the road. The Assembly’s version of the legislation would codify parts of the Governor’s NY SUN initiative. Vision also represented the LI Lobby Coalition for this bill.

The other four bills included: the Environmental Protection Fund Enhancement Act (S.5403A / A.7137A) to increase resources allocated to the state's Environmental Protection Fund (EPF), the Child Safe Products Act (A.3141A) to protect New York's children from toxic chemicals, the Global Warming Pollution Cap (A.5346 / S.2742) to require that climate-altering pollution from all sources is cut by 80 percent by the year 2050, and the Fracking Hazardous Waste Loophole (A.7013 / S.4616) to end special exemptions that allow the gas industry to circumvent requirements for hazardous waste disposal, including fracking wastes.

After reviewing the legislation, presentations were given by New York State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli, Assemblyman Robert Sweeney, and Senator Mark Grisanti who all voiced their support for the environmental legislation. DiNapoli explained that the environment and economy work hand-in-hand, and that we need a more long-term approach to the protecting the environment. Sweeney noted that the EPF was not cut this year, for the first year in some time, and it is time to bring it back up to stable levels. He also expressed the need to introduce a new environmental bond act next year. Grisanti was eager about the day’s agenda, and mentioned that the solar jobs legislation could bring 22,000 jobs to the state.

The crowd split into 25 small groups for the afternoon lobby visits. Vision was met with Senator Carl Marcellino and Staff for Senator Owen Johnson and Assemblyman Steve Englebright, and others throughout the afternoon. There was broad support for the Super Bills and for the advancement of solar energy on Long Island!

Earth Day Lobby Day was hosted by the Adirondack Council, Adirondack Mountain Club, Alliance for New York State Parks, Catskill Citizens for Safe Energy, Catskill Mountainkeeper, Citizens Campaign for the Environment, Clean and Healthy New York, Environmental Advocates of New York, Natural Resources Defense Council, New York Interfaith Power and Light, New York League of Conservation Voters, New York Public Interest Research Group, Pace Energy and Climate Center, Public Employees Federation Division 169, Riverkeeper, Scenic Hudson, Sierra Club, Sullivan Citizens for Responsible Energy Development, The Nature Conservancy, the Tri-State Transportation Campaign, and cosponsored by additional organizations.

Read more at Environmental Advocates of NY’s website.

Pedestrian fatalities in Nassau happen near transit, study finds

According to an analysis by Tri-State Transportation Campaign, 83% of pedestrian fatalities (68 of 82) in Nassau County between 2008 and 2010 occurred within ¼ mile of a transit hub.  TSTC writes, “The clustering of pedestrian fatalities surrounding transit stations may occur because the areas tend to be pedestrian hubs. People often walk to and from transit stops, especially bus stops, and bus routes are often found along arterial roads whose design is a leading cause of pedestrian fatalities in the region.” 

Hopefully, this data can inspire more traffic calming projects and funding that are targeted into our areas with transit hubs. The NYC Department of Transportation has a model program called Safe Routes to Transit which works to improve pedestrian safety near mass transit and 
the New Jersey DOT’s Safe Streets to Transit program targets grants to municipalities interested in promoting greater transit use through safer access. Long Island municipalities and the NYS DOT should work to develop similar programs and target existing traffic calming dollars into these locations. 
Vision’s Eric Alexander was interviewed on this study in Fios1 News.
Read about the study on Tri-State Transportation Campaign’s blog.

Poll: Business community opposes SEQRA takeover

Last week, 79% of voters on Long Island Business News' website opposed the proposed state takeover of SEQRA. The poll was listed on the main page of the site and logged IP addresses to ensure that each computer could only cast one vote. It should be noted that the publication has a generally pro-development readership. Here are the full results from the 400 respondants:

Should SEQRA approval authority be taken out of municipalities' hands and be given to the state?

  • No, authority should remain with local governments. (79%, 314 Votes)
  • Yes, but only for regionally significant projects. (15%, 58 Votes)
  • Yes, for all projects. (7%, 28 Votes)
NYS lawmakers have put forth a bill that would block the takeover (S.6525 (Marcellino) and A.9541 (Schimel)). The legislation has gained some new sponsors since we last covered this issue: Senator Marcellino is joined by Senators Fuschillo, Johnson and Martins and Assemblywoman Schimel is joined by Assemblymembers Saladino, Curran, Ra, Montesano, McDonough, McKevitt, Murray and Weisenberg.
Read more at LIBN

Central Islip Visioning draws over 200 to plan future park


Pictured (L-R): Debbie Cavangh - Coalition of Good Neighbors, Amparo Saddler - Central Islip Parks Committee, Scott Martella - Office of NYS Governor Andrew Cuomo, Nancy Manfredonia - Central Islip Civic Council, Debbie Rotunda - Central Islip Parks Committee, Islip Town Councilman Steve Flotteron, NYS Assemblyman Phil Ramos, Suffolk County Legislator Rick Montano, NYS Senator Lee Zeldin

On Saturday, April 28th, over 200 families, young people, seniors, chamber members and other local stakeholders gathered for the Central Islip Visioning at Central Islip High School. The goal of this visioning, spearheaded by Islip Town Councilman Steve Flotteron and facilitated by Vision Long Island, was to design a 20-acre park in the heart of the community. The meeting was filled with an excited and positive energy and some consensus developed on possible uses for the park.

The charette began with brief comments from community and government leaders. Vision Long Island Executive Director Eric Alexander kicked things off by introducing the Town’s park committee that is seeking more community input for the project. The community’s goals are to build something multi-generational and multi-use. The park, which is currently an under-utilized space, will be adjacent to the new Jobco housing development Coventry Gardens and will be funded in part through a public benefits fund from local developers. Community leaders noted that Central Islip has been waiting 50 years for this park!

Additional speakers included: Debbie Cavanaugh of the Coalition of Good Neighbors, Amparo Saddler of the Parks Committee, Debbie Rotunda of the Parks Committee, Nancy Manfredonia of the Central Islip Civic Council, Councilman Steve Flotteron, Scott Martella from Governor Cuomo’s office, Suffolk County Legislator Rick Montano, NYS Assemblyman Phil Ramos, NYS Senator Lee Zeldin and Vision Assistant Director (and Central Islip resident) Tawaun Weber. 

The day before the meeting, Vision worked with the Islip Youth Mentoring program to do a mini-charrette with several middle school students. The youth presented their ideas, which included concession stands, spray or water park, basketball courts, a skateboard park, a theater, a dog park with dog sitters, restaurants, an ice skating rink, tennis courts, volleyball courts, bocce ball courts, bike riding paths, sufficient parking, bathrooms, water fountains, ‘you are here’ maps, and a jogging trail around perimeter. The kids concluded that they want officials to “show us the money.” 

Following the kick-off speeches, Vision Long Island Sustainability Director Elissa Ward went through a presentation showing some of the possibilities for the park, opening people’s minds to various possibilities. The community then did an image preference survey, where they got to vote on a wide variety of options for park uses.

An important interactive activity had participants list some of the “hopes and horrors” for the park. The list of hopes was much longer than the horrors, the latter which included fear of gang infiltration and the idea that park maintenance and cleaning would not be kept up. Later in the day, people were given stickers that were used to vote on their favorite hopes and worst-case-scenario horrors. Among the top choices for hopes were: a place for families to gather; a running/biking path with exercise stations; fields for sports such as soccer, basketball or football; a spray park or fountain for kids; picnic and BBQ areas; a bandshell or performance area; a dog park; a wildlife center; a display of the history of Central Islip and many others. 

During a brief question and answer session, main concerns included the time frame of the park’s completion and how to finance it. Another community meeting is planned for late June and the Town hopes to break ground in the fall, after which it should take 6-12 months to complete. As for funding, beyond the seed money the Town has from the public benefits fund, there are several sources available at the state or regional level, and with a united plan, the community is primed to access those funds. 

Maps and tracing paper were distributed to the tables and groups used the ideas generated throughout the morning to put pen to paper and design the park! The table groups were very creative, with most staying true to the hopes and horrors results. Adults worked in fun activities for kids, and the kids planned spaces for seniors to go. 

Throughout the day, the diversity and energy in the room was infectious, and we look forward to seeing this multi-use and muliti-generational park get built!

Here’s what some folks are saying about the park:

“I am very excited that this project is finally starting to happen. We have been waiting 50 years for this park in Central Islip. We want to make it a multi-generational area, for all ages to enjoy. It has been wonderful to work with the Town of Islip, Vision Long Island and community leaders who spent a lot of hours together to make this happen.” - Amparo Saddler, Central Islip Chamber and Central Islip Park & Recreation Committee

“This parkland is 50 years in the making. We are excited this current town board, including Supervisor Tom Croci and Councilman Steve Flotteron, have kept their campaign promises to build the park,” - Debbie Cavanagh, Coalition of Good Neighbors.

“We want to tell people CI is here! We’re real, we don’t bite! It’s safe to come here! … Dream on this, think the biggest things you can think of. Because you know what? We might just find a way to make it happen.” - Debbie Rotunda, Parks Committee

“We have been working for many years to get some good recreational facilities for our kids, and I’m absolutely thrilled to see all of you here today because this is really a turning point in our community for our children.” - Nancy Manfredonia, Central Islip Civic Council

“We wanted an open, transparent process where everyone can participate and take ownership in the end result. Recognizing that the community knows best their needs and desires for this park, we are pleased to introduce a process that will bring their vision to life.”  - Steve Flotteron, Town of Islip Councilman

“This is about beautifying our communities here on LI, to make this a more business-friendly place. But more than that it’s about reclaiming the identity of your towns; finding a way to leave your imprint, to make this the town you want it to be, and not let other people make that decision for you...Civic engagement is what really makes our community special.” - Scott Martella, Office of Governor Cuomo

“It’s amazing how much you can accomplish when you work together with your colleagues... All levels of government are working together on this... It’s really a great reflection on the community that all of you are here this morning.” - NYS Senator Lee Zeldin

“There is no Democratic way to revitalize a downtown or Republican way to fix a park. We know what we have to do. Campaign is campaign, but there’s a time for us to do our jobs and work together and get the resources and just make it happen.” - NYS Assemblyman Phil Ramos

“This is a dream that Central Islip has pursued for many years... Anything that we can do to in the County of Suffolk to improve the quality of life for the community that I represent, believe me we’re going to do it.” - Suffolk County Legislator Rick Montano


Pictured (L-R): Nancy Manfredonia - Central Islip Civic Council, Debbie Cavanagh - Coalition of Good Neighbors, Amparo Saddler - Central Islip Parks Committee, NYS Senator Lee Zeldin, Islip Town Councilman Steve Flotteron, Suffolk County Legislator Rick Montano, Central Islip Youth Mentoring Program representatives, Scott Martella - Office of NYS Governor Andrew Cuomo, NYS Assemblyman Phil Ramos, Eric Alexander - Vision Long Island

Transportation bill heads to conference committee with LI reps

The federal transportation bill has been slowly advancing in the last month. As a reminder, the Senate passed their progressive and balanced MAP-21, which will provide adequate funding for transit, walking and biking, and other Smart Growth-friendly programs. The House of Representatives failed to pass the controversial HR 7 legislation, which would have decimated dedicated transit funding and most community traffic calming programs. The House instead passed the ninth 3-month extension of existing legislation, set to expire in June. 

On top of that, the House has passed a tenth extension to last through September, but unfortunately this one is not a “clean” extension, meaning it includes controversial provisions like a gutting of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which allows federal agencies to issue environmental assessments or environmental impact statements. The extension also includes the XL Keystone Pipeline, which has nothing to do with transportation and the White House has threatened to veto. 

These changes in the extension mean that the Senate and House must now work together on conference committee to find something that works for both sides. The first committee meeting is scheduled for May 8th. New York’s Charles Schumer is one of 14 Senators serving on the committee, and in the House there will be 33 members including Long Island’s Tim Bishop, Richard Hanna, and Jerrold Nadler. Washington insiders suggest that the House could still bring in pieces of HR 7 into this process, so it is important to watch this process. We eagerly await to see how this plays out, and hope that our representatives can come to an agreement quickly. 
Read more at The Hill and Newsday.

WSJ: TOD the way to go

Vision Long Island was cited in an article in the Wall Street Journal this week that highlights changing market preference toward walkable, transit-oriented communities. The article describes an older couple that made the choice to leave their suburban home to move into a condo in a downtown near a train station and notes the increasing frequency of such decisions. 

The article explains, “Developers say this type of project is now one of the fastest-growing areas of the housing market. The growth comes as developers regroup after the housing and financial crises. Some developers say they aim to focus more on these projects. Efforts to rein in sprawl slowly gathered steam over the past couple of decades, but the housing bust helped shape this latest crop of TOD newcomers. During the housing frenzy, Americans were willing to buy a pricey home an hour or more from their workplaces. But now gas prices around $4 a gallon have made that commute costly. Plus, housing values have dropped by a third or more since the 2006 peak, so tying up one's net worth in a suburban home that isn't guaranteed to increase in value seems too big a risk.”

It continues, “More than 6,000 units [of housing] have been approved for construction near transit hubs since 2006, up from just 374 between 2001 and 2005, according to Vision Long Island, an antisprawl planning group. While single-family home construction remains depressed, local leaders have grown more enthusiastic about multifamily development, particularly around train stations, says Eric Alexander, Vision Long Island's executive director.”
Read the full article at the Wall Street Journal.

Take Action on LI Lobby Coalition bills: Commuter Transit Benefits and Sewage Pollution Right to Know

The Long Island Lobby Coalition continues to advance our 2012 platform, and we need your help to pass some critical legislation in New York State. These two bills demand swift action in the Senate and Assembly.

Save Commuter Transit Benefits - A.6175B
This legislation will restore New York State's mass transit tax benefit, which will help reduce your commuting costs. NYS Senator Charles Fuschillo, the Chair of the Senate Transportation Committee, is leading the charge by pushing legislation to restore the benefit for NY residents.

Last year, eligible commuters could set aside up to $230 a month of their pre-tax salary to cover mass-transit commuting expenses under federal law (which New York State follows). However, Washington’s failure to renew the law by the December 31st deadline resulted in this benefit being cut nearly in half for 2012, taking more money out of the pockets of mass-transit commuters. The monthly limit for transit benefits is now $125, while the limit for parking benefits was increased to $240 per month. With transit demand and ridership consistently increasing in our region and dozens of community revitalization processes underway that set goals for increased transit use, it makes no sense for government to provide disincentives for using public transportation. The New York State transit commuter benefits bill will permanently restore the commuter’s pre-tax deduction benefit on their state taxes, whether or not Congress acts in the future.

Senator Fuschillo has been championing this bill. He recently said, “Every day that passes without restoring this benefit is another day of added costs on New York’s overburdened commuters. Taxing people more just to get to work is the last thing we should be doing in this economy. It’s long past time to restore this benefit.”  Read more here.

Fuschillo’s bill passed the Senate on February 13th (S.2728C, Fuschillo), and now we await action in the Assembly (A.6175B, Weisenberg). Visit Fuschillo’s website to sign a petition, and contact your NYS Assembly Member today and tell them to support this legislation!

Sewage Pollution Right-to-Know - S.6268A
New York State’s sewage infrastructure is aging and failing. More than a quarter of the sewage treatment plants in NYS are beyond their life expectancy and many more are using inadequate technology. The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation conservatively estimates that repairing, replacing and updating New York’s sewage infrastructure will cost $36.2 billion over the next twenty years. Outdated and dilapidated sewage infrastructure results in the discharge of billions of gallons of raw or untreated sewage into local waterways throughout the state annually.

When raw sewage enters our waterways, it often contains disease-causing microorganisms, human waste, pesticides, oil, grease, drugs, toxic pollutants, and other contaminants; which negatively impact our waterways and drinking water. Adverse health impacts from parasites, viruses, and bacteria found in raw sewage include short-term gastrointestinal problems, infections and fevers; and long-term chronic conditions such as liver, heart, or kidney failure; as well as arthritis and cancer. Sewage pollution also contributes to beach closures that are responsible for economic losses of $1 – 2 billion annually in the US.

There is currently no law requiring public notification if a sewage overflow has contaminated a local beach, waterway, or entered a community. Often, immediately after a sewage overflow, people can be seen swimming, fishing, crabbing, or kayaking in the contaminated area. This is unacceptable! The public deserves prompt notification anytime a spill or discharge of partially treated or raw sewage occurs. Prompt and accessible notification about sewage overflows will allow New Yorkers to make safe choices for our families and avoid unnecessary exposure to harmful pollution.

We need New York State to support a Sewage Pollution Right-to-Know law. Sewage overflows put our environment, economy, and health at risk; and we deserve the right to know when they occur. This is simple and common-sense legislation that must move forward immediately. The bill passed the Assembly on April 26th (A.9420A, Sweeney), and on the same day was voted through the Senate’s Environmental Conservation Committee. The Senate bill (S.6268A, Grisanti) could be up for a vote as soon as next week, so please support this legislation by contacting your Senator today!

Grants available for downtown farmers markets

The US Department of Agriculture has announced a competitive grant that aims to increase the availability of local agricultural products in communities throughout the county. They will also help strengthen farmer-to-consumer marketing efforts. 

The Farmers Market Promotion Program (FMPP) offers grants to help improve and expand domestic farmers’ markets, roadside stands, community-supported agriculture programs, agri-tourism activities and other direct producer-to-consumer market opportunities. Agricultural cooperatives, producer networks, producer associations, local governments, nonprofit corporations, public benefit corporations, economic development corporations, regional farmers’ market authorities and Tribal governments are among those eligible to apply. Approximately $10 million in FMPP grants are available in fiscal year 2012. The maximum amount awarded for any one proposal cannot exceed $100,000. Projects that expand healthy food choices in food deserts or low-income areas (where the percentage of the population living in poverty is 20 percent or above) will receive additional consideration. 

Learn more and access the Notice of Funding Availability here.

NYS Governor's Traffic Safety Committee accepting grant application

The NYS Governor's Traffic Safety Committee (GTSC) is currently accepting applications for grant funding opportunities related to traffic safety initiatives for Federal fiscal year 2013. The grants are currently split into three distinct and one general program:

Selective Traffic Enforcement Program (STEP): Grants under this program will be used to fund overtime for enforcement of dangerous driving behaviors, including speed and distraction. Police agencies will use local data to determine problem areas and develop countermeasures to reduce crashed. Applicants who are approved must support these activities with public information and education efforts.

Buckle Up New York (BUNY): Grants under this program will focus on seat belt enforcement and will provide overtime funding to participate in the statewide seat belt enforcement mobilization for 2013. Applicants who are approved will conduct use surveys and participate in public information efforts.

Child Passenger Safety (CPS): CPS grants will be used to support child passenger safety activities including fitting stations, traning and education programs, child passenger safety check events and car seat distribution programs for low income families. Agencies that apply must have a certified technician.

General Highway Safety Grants - Programs for Local, State and Nonprofit Agencies: The general grant used by agencies to apply for funding to address a particular highway safety problem in their jurisdiction. Applicants will need to submit a narrative outline of the problem with supporting data and details for the proposed activities with milestones and an evaluation plan.

Agencies eligible to apply include law enforcement agencies, local governments and state agencies and non-profit organizations registered with NYS. Funding will vary by program. For questions regarding these grants you can review the programs online here or call 518-474-5111. The deadline for applications is May 15th and can be submitted to:

New York State Governor's Traffic Safety Committee
Department of Motor Vehicles
6 Empire Plaza, Room 414
Albany, NY 1228

NYS Department of Environmental Conservation grants available

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is currently accepting applications for Technical Assistance Grants (TAGs). TAGs are tools available to eligible community groups to increase public awareness and understanding of remedial activities taking place at certain contaminated sites in their communities. The grants are intended to help the recipient and the community it represents understand existing environmental data developed about the site, comment on site remedial activities and proposals and share them with the community. No matching contributions are required on the part of the grant recipient.

Under the TAG program, eligible sites include State Superfund Program and Brownfield Cleanup Program sites that pose a significant threat to public health or the environment. Eligible groups must be non-responsible parties incorporated as not-for-profit corporations under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. An eligible community group must certify that its membership represents the interest of the community affected by the site and that its members’ health, economic well-being or enjoyment of the environment is potentially threatened by the site. Funding will be offered at up to $50,000 per site. The deadline is rolling.

For more information visit the DEC website, or contact the TAG Coordinator, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Division of Environmental Remediation, 625 Broadway, Albany, New York 12233-7012, or 518-402-9711.

PRPLI to hold Awards Gala on May 8th

The Public Relations Professionals of Long Island will hold their 22nd annual Awards Gala on Tuesday, May 8th from 6-9:30pm at Chateau Caterers, 440 Old Country Road in Carle Place. The event honors Steve Haweeli, President of WordHampton with the Jack Rettaliata Lifetime Achievement award; Teresa Rizzuto, Commissioner of Long Island MacArthur Airport with the Long Island Achievement award; Bernadette Starzee, Freelance Columnist-Reporter with the Media Member award; Debra Scala-Giokas, Director of Marketing for Certilman Balin Adler & Hyman, LLP with the Mentor award; Audrey Cohen, Account Director of Epoch 5 Public Relations for the"Bethpage Air Show at Jones Beach" for PR Campaign; and Victoria Tringone, Director of Marketing for Campolo, Middleton & McCormick, LLP with the Rising Star award.

Tickets are $75 each for members and $100 each for non-members, with available sponsorship opportunities. Learn more and register hereor email Enza Tullo at emtc33@gmail.com. You can also visit their website for more information.

Town of North Hempstead to hold Downtown Revitalization Conference on May 11th

On Friday, May 11th, from 8:15am to 12:30pm, the Town of North Hempstead Business & Tourism Development Corp. and the Town of North Hempstead Office of Inter-Municipal Coordination (OIC) are co-hosting a free Half-Day Downtown Revitalization Conference at the Harbor Links Club House, One Fairway Drive, Port Washington.

This special Half-Day Conference features an All-Star list of professionals including: Robert & Victor Dadras, Dadras Architects speaking on How to Design a Downtown Strategy; Michael Levine, Commissioner of Town of North Hempstead Planning Department on Using Zoning as a Planning Tool; Bob Retnauer, RDA Landscape Architects on Place Branding - Streetscape Ecology; Larisa Ortiz, Larisa Ortiz Associates on Retail Recruitment Strategy; Thomas Brown & Michael King, Nelson/Nygaard Consulting Associates on Parking, Bicycle & Pedestrian Planning; Mindy Germain, Executive Director & Daniel D. Donatelli, Co-president, Residents for a More Beautiful Port Washington on Building Community Consensus; Dawn Blinn, Executive Director, Village of Westbury Business Improvement District on Developing an Organizational Structure to Bring It All Together and Doug Aloise, Executive Director, Town of Huntington Community Development Agency on How To Finance Your Downtown Efforts.  North Hempstead Supervisor Jon Kaiman will open the session with a Welcome Address and New York State Senator Jack Martins will present the Keynote Address which will focus on his role as the Mayor of the Village of Mineola who initiated its downtown efforts.

A full breakfast is being served and refreshments will be available throughout the morning.

If you are interested in attending, they can fax the form to 516.869.2468 or phone 516.869.7759. You can also register online here.

Environmental Equinox Awards to be held on May 17th

Join Citizens Campaign for the Environment as they celebrate 27 years of grassroots accomplishments at the 2012 Environmental Equinox Awards Gala. This year, CCE will be honoring Dr. Nathalia Rogers, Director of American Communities Institute at Dowling College, and Dr. Christopher Gobler of SUNY Stony Brook School of Marine & Atmospheric Sciences. The Gala includes dinner and dancing. 

The Gala will take place on Thursday, May 17th from 6:30-11:00pm at The Woodbury Country Club, 884 Jericho Turnpike in Woodbury. To purchase tickets, please print and return the response form to CCE, 225A Main Street, Farmingdale, NY 11735 or contact Maureen at 516-390-7150. Individual tickets are $150 and sponsorship opportunities are available. 

Citizens Campaign for the Environment  (CCE) was formed in 1985 by a small group of concerned citizens who recognized the need to provide public involvement to advance stronger environmental policy. Today, after 25 years as a not-for-profit, non-partisan advocacy organization, CCE has grown to an 80,000-member organization with offices in Farmingdale, White Plains, Albany, Syracuse, Buffalo, NY and Hamden, CT. CCE continues to work to empower the public by providing members with opportunities to participate in the political process and thereby advance a strong environmental agenda.

Help Wanted

Intern with Vision this spring!

Vision Long Island is looking for interns for Spring 2012. Our staff likes to say we "wear many hats," and interns will have to do the same. Interns will assist with planning, design, outreach, event planning, writing, research, attending meetings, reporting, photography, video and more. Bring your unique skill set to the table! We are looking for energetic and conscientious individuals with an interest in urban/suburban planning from a bottom-up perspective. This is a valuable opportunity to work with great people and learn about the issues impacting Long Island. Strong writing skills a plus.

To learn more or apply, send a resume, cover letter and writing sample to info@visionlongisland.org. Put Spring 2012 Internship in the subject heading. For more information, call our office at 631-261-0242.

Theatre Listings

Check out what downtown theaters and performing arts centers are playing this weekend! Consider visiting a local bar or restaurant, or doing some shopping before or after the show.

Bay Street Theater
The Long Wharf, Sag Harbor:
Seussical: The Musical - Friday, May 4th at 7:30 pm, Saturday May 5th and Sunday, May 6th at 2:00 pm
Tickets and more information available here.

Boulton Center
37 West Main Street, Bay Shore:
Steve Forbert in Concert - Friday, May 4th at 8:00 pm
Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra in Concert - Saturday, May 5th at 8:00 pm
Tickets and more information available here

John W. Engeman Theater
250 Main Street, Northport:
42nd Street - Friday, May 4th at 8:00 pm, Saturday, May 5th at 3:00 and 8:00 pm, and Sunday, May 6th at 2:00 and 7:00 pm
Tickets and more information available here

Guildhall, John Drew Theater
158 Main Street, East Hampton
Uncle Vanya by Anton Chekhov - Friday, May 4th and Saturday, May 5th at 8:00 pm and Sunday, May 6th at 7:00 pm
Tickets and more information available here

Landmark on Main Street, the Jeanne Rimsky Theater
232 Main Street, Port Washington:
Landmark Children's Series: Skippyjon Jones - Sunday, May 6th at 2:00 pm
Tickets and more information available here

Patchogue Theater for the Performing Arts
71 East Main Street, Patchogue:
No shows this weekend
Tickets and more information available here

The Paramount
370 New York Ave, Huntington:
George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic in Concert - Saturday, May 5th at 8:00 pm
Tickets and more information available here

Theatre Three
412 Main Street, Port Jefferson:
From the Fires: Voices of the Holocaust - Friday, May 4th at 1:00 pm
The Adventures of Peter Rabbit - Saturday, May 5th at 11:00 am
Play Dates - Friday, May 4th and Saturday, May 5th at 8:00 pm
Friday Night Face Off - Friday, April 20th at 10:30 pm
Satisfaction, a Rolling Stones Tribute - Sunday, May 6th at 7 pm
Tickets and more information available here

Vail-Leavitt Music Hall
18 Peconic Avenue, Riverhead:
No shows this weekend
Tickets and more information available here

Museums

Museums in or near Long Island downtowns:

Garvies Point Museum and Preserve
50 Barry Drive, Glen Cove
The museum is a center for research on Long Island geology, Native American archeology and natural history. Current exhibits feature, “The Seasonal Round”, an exploration through Long Island Native American life throughout the seasons. Exhibits on Long Island’s glacial formation, landform change and cultural evolution are on display. Prehistoric artifacts and audio descriptions add to the story of Long Island migrants, their lifestyles and interactions with newcomers such as Europeans. The museum has special educational programs to accommodate field trips and science research on the history of Long Island.
To arrange a visit, call 516-571-8011 and for information and brochures, visit their website

Fine Arts Museums of Long Island
295 Fulton Ave, Hempstead
The museum highlights pieces of contemporary and pre-Columbian art which have travelled internationally. It features innovative technologies such as, an interactive computer center, a video room and computer assisted art displays. These technologies give an innovative museum experience to enrich the value taken away by visitors. The 21st century experience is fitting for student field trips as well as visitors of all ages.
For information, visit their website or call 516-481-5700

Cold Spring Harbor Whaling Museum
Main Street, Cold Spring Harbor
The museum explores the relationship between Long Islanders and the sea through. It details the history of the regional whaling industry, whale conservation and the history of Cold Spring Harbor as a maritime port. A new exhibit, “Right Whales”, highlights the biology, history and decline of the Right Whale. Exhibits featuring New York’s only fully-equipped 19th century whaleboat, ship logs and correspondence as well as whaling and maritime artifacts. Art programs are available for all ages.
For information, visit their website or call 631-367-3418

East Hampton Historical Society
101 Main Street, East Hampton
The headquarters for the East Hampton Historical Society, the house is an example of life in the post-colonial era in the East End. It features historic furnishings and crafts built by local craftsmen of the time. The Historical Society also has four other museums and town houses including one of New York’s first educational academies and a colonial town government meeting house.
For information, visit their website or call 631-324-6850

Heckscher Museum
2 Prime Avenue, Huntington
Located in Hecksher Park, the museum features collections of European and American paintings which spans over 500 years of Western art. Photography has become a growing part of the collection as well. Current exhibits include “A Way with Words: Text in Art”, which displays the incorporation of text in visual art and “Coming of Age in America : The Photography of Joseph Szabo”, which portraits adolescence of Long Island through time with a look at summers spent at the beach. The museum also features educational experiences for students and adults and will exhibit Long Island’s best young artists in April.
For information, visit their website or call 631-351-3250

Hicksville-Gregory Museum
Intersection of Heitz Place and Bay Avenue, Hicksville
The museum includes a history of the Heitz Place Courthouse and a collection of earth science materials to describe the natural history of the area. It features one of the few remaining Long Island lock-ups and is one of the few remaining courthouses standing from before Nassau County split from Queens. The earth science exhibit in the museum has recent additions of a Mosasaur skull, prehistoric amber and the horn of a Triceratops horridus. The educational program at the museum offers experiences in paleontology, dynamic earth processes and investigating butterflies and moths.
For information, visit their website or call 516-822-7505

Islip Art Museum
50 Irish Lane, East Islip
The museum is the leading exhibition space for contemporary art on Long Island, featuring work from international, national and emerging local artists. It is said to be the best facility of its kind outside of Manhattan. Current exhibits feature “Jam Session”, a holiday exhibit featuring paintings and sculptures influenced by music. The museum’s store features one of a kind jewelry, crafts and art work. Educational opportunists are also offered at the museum through its Cultural School of Arts.
For information, visit their website or call 631-224-5402

Long Island Maritime Museum
88 West Avenue, West Sayville
Featuring 14 acres with 9 historic buildings on the West Sayville waterfront, the museum preserves Long Island’s maritime history and heritage. It is committed to research, preservation and interpretation of the region’s nautical history and the relationship to Long Island’s natural history. The Elward Smith Library houses racing trophies and records of over 500 wrecks and groundings in the Long Island waters. The other buildings feature rotating exhibits of maps, photos, newspapers and personal accounts of maritime history. Also highlighted are boats and materials left behind by the US Life Saving Service. For information, visit their website.

Museum of the Village of Rockville Centre-Phillips House
28 Hempstead Ave, Rockville Centre
The museum is a restored 19th century Victorian home which displays life in Rockville Centre in the 19th and 20th centuries. It features furnishings, antique kitchen tools, carpentry tools and clothing of the time period. The museum is considered one of the finest small museums in the state and there is never an entrance fee for special events or exhibits.
For information, visit their website or call 516-766-0300

Oyster Bay Historical Society
20 Summit Street, Oyster Bay
The Earle-Wightman House built in 1720, gives a picture of life in Oyster Bay during the colonial period and its transition through the mid-20th Century. It features an 18th century garden, maintained by the North Country Garden Club, holds ornamental plantings as well as herbs used for cooking, medical purposes and fragrances. Exhibited are postcard, photograph, map and newspaper collections. Current exhibition, “Women Wearing History: The Force Behind Fashion”, details women’s influence on the textile and fashion industry in the 19th and 20th centuries.
For information, visit their website or call 516-922-5032

Port Jefferson Historical Society
115 Prospect Avenue, Port Jefferson
The Mather House Museum, the headquarters of The Historical Society of Greater Port Jefferson, and features several exhibitions of local artifacts. The museum complex features the 19th century home, a country store, a marine barn, a tool shed, the Spinney Clock Museum and the Thomas Jefferson Perennial Garden. Exhibitions feature ship models, period furniture and paintings, vintage tools and clothing, antique dolls, taped oral histories, 250 antique clocks and other examples of life in the 19th century.
For information, visit their website or call 631-473-2665

Sag Harbor Whaling and Historical Museum
Main and Garden Streets, Sag Harbor
The museum details Sag Harbor’s whaling industry through the 19th century and its impact on the culture and development of the area. It details how the whaling industry brought migrants from all over the globe and turned the port into an international destination. Artifacts left by whalers, antique tools, harpoons, captains’ portraits, antique furnishings and children’s toys are all on display at the museum.
For information, visit their website or call 631-725-0770

Sayville Historical Society
Edwards Street, Sayville
The museum is the headquarters to the Sayville Historical Society. The museum aims to foster historical spirit, encourage historical research and to preserve historical materials. The museum features products of both Sayville and other Suffolk localities. The Society holds 4 historic buildings, 1,500 items of clothing, 1,000 photographs, a map collection and numerous classic furnishings. Its collection is constantly growing and tours of the Edward Homestead offer a view at the area through its history.
For information, visit their website or call 631-563-0186

Sea Cliff Village Museum
95 Tenth Avenue, Sea Cliff
The museum presents changing exhibits on the history and culture of Sea Cliff. It strives to raise community awareness by preserving artifacts, photographs and costumes relating to the unique historical background of the village. It contains 287 photos taken by Long Island postcard photographer, Henry Otto Korten. Currently exhibited, “Then and Now…” displays a range of artifacts and costumes over a 125 year span. Exhibits include the Connor Cottage, Victorian Kitchen, and a historical town diorama.
For information, visit their website or call 516-671-0090

Smithtown Township Arts Council
660 Route 25A, Smithtown
The Council aims to enrich the township and surrounding area’s quality of life through celebrating and supporting the arts in everyday life. It is a goal to make art accessible to people of all backgrounds. It Mills Pond House is a valuable place in its preserved traditions as well as its evolving and unique influences. Current exhibit, “Winners Showcase” displays the artistic development and achievements of the region and nation. Classes in jewelry making, poster design, scrapbooking, pottery, drawing and several other skills and topics are available. The Council has also partnered with local downtown businesses to display local artists’ work.
For information, visit their website or call 631-862-6575

Southampton Historical Society
17 Meeting House Lane, Southampton
The Southampton Historical Society was created to preserve the town’s history as well as history from the surrounding area. Its Rogers Mansion Museum features year round exhibits, a research center and education programs for children and adults. Current exhibits include “Shopkeepers of Southampton: Photographs by Davis Gaffga”, which gives a detailed look into historic businesses which helped shape downtown and community. Its research center allows for visitors to conduct research with a professional research assistant. Collections feature antique furnishings, a classic parlor room and dining hall and photographs of the 1938 historic hurricane.
For information, visit their website or call 631-268-2494

Freeport Historical Museum
350 S Main Street, Freeport
Housed in a Civil War cottage, the museum chronicles Freeport's history through the 20th century. On display are a spinning wheel from the town’s oldest house, vaudeville-era items, waterfront memorabilia, a 1930s television and a 1777 13-star flag. The museum holds a collection of historic postcards and high school yearbooks from the early 1900s to present day.
For information, visit their website or call 979-233-3526

Palace Galleries
117 Middle Neck Road, Great Neck
The museum features highly distinctive collections of antiques, artworks and fine furnishings from around the world. It is a premier art dealer dating back to 1971 and features expertise in 17th to 19th century works. The gallery experience offers the opportunity to not only view fine art but to purchase a piece which stands out.
For information, call 516-439-5218

Long Beach Historical Museum
226 W. Penn Street, Long Beach
The museum, operated by the Long Beach Historical and Preservation Society, is a classic Craftsman-style summer villa. The house built in 1909, features large stain glass windows which are a hallmark of classic Long Beach estates. The house and backyard are furnished with local artifacts, including an original broadwalk bench, photographs and archaeological findings. The garden features original stock rose bushes.
For information, visit their website.

Movies

Nassau

Clearview Grand Avenue
1841 Grand Avenue, Baldwin
516-223-2323
clearviewcinemas.com

Bellmore Movies
222 Pettit Avenue, Bellmore
516-783-7200

Glen Cove Theatres
5 School Street, Glen Cove
516-671-6866
www.glencovetheatres.com

Clearview Squire Cinemas Great Neck
115 Middle Neck Road, Great Neck
516-466-2020
clearviewcinemas.com

Long Beach Cinema
179 East Park Avenue, Long Beach
516-431-2400

Clearview Manhasset 3
430 Plandome Road, Manhasset
516-627-7887
clearviewcinemas.com

Clearview Port Washington
116 Main Street, Port Washington
516-756-2589
clearviewcinemas.com

Clearview Roslyn Theatre
20 Tower Place, Roslyn
516-756-2589
clearviewcinemas.com

Seaford Cinemas
3951 Merrick Road, Seaford
516-409-8700
seafordcinemas.com

Suffolk

Clearview's Babylon Cinemas
34 Main Street, Babylon
clearviewcinemas.com

AMC Loews Theatres – Shore 8
37 Wall Street, Huntington
888-262-4386
amctheatres.com

Cinema Arts Centre
423 Park Ave, Huntington
631-423-7611
cinemaartscentre.org

Islip Cinemas
410 West Main Street, Islip
631-581-5200

Sayville Theatre
103 Railroad Avenue, Sayville
631-589-0232
sayvillecinemas.com

Closing Words

"When was the last time you spent a quiet moment just doing nothing - just sitting and looking at the sea, or watching the wind blowing the tree limbs, or waves rippling on a pond, a flickering candle or children playing in the park?" - Ralph Marston

Smart Talk

Newsletter Editor: Christopher Kyle, Program Coordinator, Michell Dutchen, Communications Director
Contributors: Eric Alexander, Executive Director; Tara Klein, Policy Director;
Tawaun Weber, Assistant Director; Elissa Ward, Sustainability Director

We strive to provide continued quality publications such as this each week. If you have any news or events that you would like to add to our newsletter, submit them to info@visionlongisland.org for consideration.

If you are interested in becoming a newsletter or news blast sponsor, please call the office at 631-261-0242 for rates and opportunities.

Vision Long Island
24 Woodbine Ave., Suite Two
Northport, NY 11768
Phone: 631-261-0242. Fax: 631-754-4452.
Email: info@visionlongisland.org

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